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2016 NFL Draft Preview: Corner Backs

VH3

 

The Mold


Mike Smith tends to play a lot of zone and soft coverage’s to allow his corners to make plays on the ball. Jason Licht has shown an affinity for ball hawks and overall play makers in the defensive backfield. The Buccaneers will be looking for good ball players with high self confidence above all else with length being a major plus given the division the team plays in. Look for zone coverage traits to be a focal point of any potential Buccaneer corner target.


 

Who are the prospects and where do they fit?


 

1.Vernon Hargreaves III, Corner Back, Florida

Height: 5’10″

Weight: 204 lbs

Class: Junior

Tackles: 33

Tackles for a Loss: 1

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 1

Pass Breakups: 4

Interceptions: 4

Skillset Evaluation:

Hargreaves is the premier zone corner in this draft. Hargreaves displays tremendous explosion out of his back pedal to come up for the football. Shows the ability to sink his hips into his forward drive and isn’t afraid to square up and take on a ball carrier. Hargreaves doesn’t shy from helping in run support, displaying the craftiness to avoid blocks and short area quickness to close and wrap up. When in man, Hargreaves shows the ability to stick on the hip and track step for step with some of the best footwork in the draft class. Hargreaves shows top notch body control and very good balance. Hargreaves will need to work on discipline as he has shown a tendency to bite hard on double moves and will attempt to jump routes often. Has shown keen instincts and ball skills, high pointing the ball in the air and consistently battling for 50/50 balls. Hargreaves lacks elite top end speed but is a machine when it comes to quick twitch movement and swallows underneath routes. Top notch competitiveness and aggression from the corner spot. Will be dinged for height concerns but makes up for it as best as he can with leaping ability and quickness. Hargreaves has very good soft hands and sees the ball in regularly while consistently finding himself around the football as shown by his 10 interceptions and 27 pass defenses in his three seasons.

Background:

Hargreaves III left the Wharton high school campus and stepped right into the limelight in the Swamp as a freshman. Hargreaves is a 3-time all SEC as well as All American honors his last two seasons. Hargreaves is two things as a player and person, confident and a team first guy. “I just want to win,” Hargreaves told The Inside Read during the preseason. “My biggest thing before any award or anything else is winning. That’s who I am. That’s what I like to do.” As far as confidence? There’s that too. “I’m the best,” Hargreaves says. “No doubt.” “I’m my own type of corner,” Hargreaves says. “I feel like my game is a little bit different than everybody else’s in terms of what I can do and I like to do.” Hargreaves has kept out of trouble through some rough times where players around the program haven’t always made the best choices. A dedicated player with a great work ethic that strives to be great, that’s Hargreaves. Hargreaves will barely be 21 by the time camp comes around.

Team Fit:

The Buccaneers corners struggled to cover and tackle all season long. Hargreaves would boost both issues while giving the team the vocal trash talker that can back it up that many fans want to see. At a position where confidence is a premium trait, Hargreaves brings enough for everyone. Hargreaves along the other side from Banks and even inside the slot in nickel packages would be a major boost to the secondary. Hargreaves boasts reliable punt return hands and is a threat to take a pick or punt to the house.

 

 

 

2.William Jackson III, Corner Back, Houston

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 189 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 43

Tackles for a Loss: 1.5

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 23

Interceptions: 5

Skillset Evaluation:

Solid height and length for the position. Displayed ability to adjust while in coverage and play the route. Knack for finishing routes like a receiver. Turns head and spots ball, displayed a willingness to contest regularly on catches. Shows good acceleration out of breaks when coming up out of zone drop. Jackson impressed with a team record and NCAA leading 23 pass breakups. Shows good understanding of play and displayed solid instincts overall. Jackson doesn’t play with ideal strength and can struggle with press coverage. When coming out of his backpedal to run downfield he will get to tall which causes him to lose speed, does a good job staying low when driving forward out of the back pedal. Not a big factor in run support, often taking the easier and longer path to the ball then going right up into traffic. Will struggle on screens to get off blocks and doesn’t regularly square up on tackles. Jackson needs to work on his strength in order for his height to be a true advantage. Jackson played almost exclusively in single man coverage while at Houston.

Background:

Jackson finished his career at Houston with a Senior Bowl invite, Peach Bowl MVP, ALL ACC honors and finishing up on SI’s all Bowl Team. Jackson had the opportunity to leave early for the NFL but stayed for his teammates and his development. “If I’m good like (the draft analysts) say I am, one year shouldn’t change anything.” Jackson is in the process of learning to lead young men and took on that role prior to the 2015 season. “I just have to learn my leader role. I’ve never been a leader,” he said. “I’m just learning to be a leader and get the young guys on board.”

Team Fit:

The Buccaneers are pretty void of true ascending talent in the defensive backfield and Jackson would bring some much needed talent to the group. Mike Smith tends to play soft coverage but with the ever changing NFL, Jackson is a needed player for almost any team with his experience in man coverage and natural talent that should be fine in zone looks.

 

 

 

3.Eli Apple, Corner Back, Ohio State

Height: 6’1″

Weight: 199 lbs

Class: redshirt Sophomore

Tackles: 33

Tackles for a Loss: 2

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 7

Interceptions: 1

Skillset Evaluation:

Apple has good length and height for the position. Apple shows solid footwork and transition speed. Competes for ball in air and turns head while high pointing ball. Displayed good physicality and strength to redirect receivers off line and stick to the hip in coverage. When left on an island, Apple displayed the discipline to not jump routes and stay on his assignment. In zone, Apple shows below average instincts and must see the play happen before reacting, rarely reading eyes. Will struggle with deep balls, often getting handsy and not turning his head while chasing. Struggles in run support, evading contact. Lazy “dive” tackler at times. Still learning and ascending as a player.

Background:

Apple came to Ohio State as a high recruit and after a redshirt season, did not disappoint. Apple had an iron deficiency his freshman year and once under control, really began to shine as a player. Apple finished his career at Ohio State with second team Big-Ten honors. Played with many big names at Ohio State and was not a team leader with the presence of Vonn Bell next to him at safety. No character concerns.

Team Fit:

Apple, like Hargreaves and Alexander, is a very young corner that is still developing and growing each year as a player. Apple would give the Bucs a potential long term number 2 corner who may one day grow into a number 1.

 

 

 

4.Kendall Fuller, Corner Back, Virginia Tech **Injured in ’15, stats from ’14**

Height: 5’11″

Weight: 187 lbs

Class: Junior

Tackles: 54

Tackles for a Loss: 4.5

Sacks: 2

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 13

Interceptions: 2

Skillset Evaluation:

Fuller displays very good zone traits with a quick burst out of his backpedal and solid instincts. Fuller does a good job coming up and making plays in the passing lanes and wreaks havoc in the flats. Does a good job releasing off to the secondary and sits tight in zones. Highly confident player, not afraid to make mistakes. Does a good job pressing at the LOS and is a very willing participant against the run. Like Hargreaves, Fuller will be questioned a bit about his size and susceptibility against double moves. When beaten deep, Fuller will struggle to turn around his head and gets handsy down the sidelines. Best fit will be with a zone based team. Discipline in man coverage needs work and his recovery speed is suspect.

Background:

Fuller is the 4th brother to have played at Virginia Tech and will enter the draft and become the 4th NFL player of the group. Brother Kyle was a first round pick for Chicago in 2014 and Kendall has every bit as much talent as his older brother. High School All American, Freshman All American and two All ACC team nods. Coming off a torn meniscus that forced him to shut down in 2015 after attempting to play through it. Noted hard worker, dedicated to his craft and a leader for Virginia Tech’s defense.

Team Fit:

Mike Smith tends to run a lot of soft coverage and Fuller would thrive in this type of defense, allowing him to use his ball hawk prowess and tackling skills to make an impact. Fuller will need some grooming but by year two should be a reliable starter.

 

 

 

 

5. Mackensie Alexander, Corner Back, Clemson

Height: 5’10″

Weight: 190 lbs

Class: redshirt Sophomore

Tackles: 23

Tackles for a Loss: 2

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 5

Interceptions: 0

Skillset Evaluation:

Alexander’s best attribute is his competitive nature and self confidence. Alexander sticks to his mans hip in coverage better than almost all other corners in this draft. Shows good short area quickness and mirror skills. Solid back pedal and sinks hips in and out of breaks. Shows good natural instincts when eyes are on the quarterback and does a great job coming up to make the plays in the flats. Alexander rarely plays the ball, often too fixated on staying with his man and it shows up in the lack of PBU’s. Alexander has shown very little in the form of natural ball skills and failed to record a single interception in his two seasons. Alexander while feisty, struggles to make plays against the run and is swallowed up by blockers. Lacks the functional strength to compete against the run. Displays less than ideal footwork, made up for by great athleticism and balance. Doesn’t consistently win the press battle at the LOS. Like Fuller and Hargreaves, size and length may be an issue for NFL teams. For Alexander and the zone scheme, this becomes a slight bigger problem with his lack of ball skills and his fixation on playing the man and not the ball. That said, Alexander’s ability to blanket a receiver makes all the difference, as quarterbacks threw his way all of 7% of the time his first year starting.

Background:

Vocal mouth piece for the Clemson secondary and All American trash talker. Tremendously hard worker, growing up picking tomatoes in his home state of Florida. Confidence comes natural when you put in the work. “I want to be the best corner in the country, and I know for a fact that I am,” he said. “But I want to show people. It’s about showing them every day.” Alexander comes from a hard working family, growing up in the small town of Immokalee.”Nobody’s really got much,” Alexander said. “You do your job, you work, you clock in and clock out.” “You watch your parents, the way they work, and you bring that to whatever you do,” he said. “It’s an easy process. You do your job. And you work.” Alexander has a clean history off the field and a good up bringing that has kept him in line all his life.

Team Fit:

Fans will love the loud mouth approach to the game that Alexander and Hargreaves would bring. More so for the team, it’s their on field play that makes the difference. Alexander would excel in a slot role where his quickness and grittiness allow him to grind down receivers. Alexander may lack the desired height, but he plays much bigger than his measurements.

 

 

 

 

6. Deiondre’ Hall, Corner Back, Northern Iowa

Height: 6’2″

Weight: 199 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 82

Tackles for a Loss: 5.5

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 3

Pass Breakups: 4

Interceptions: 6

Skillset Evaluation:

Incredible length for the position and skillset that matches up well with zone coverage teams. Showed the ability to consistently win the matchup with 50/50 balls, coming down with 6 of his own. Showed decent strength at the POA when asked to press. Displayed above average instincts and awareness, often helping jump routes when allowed to read the quarterbacks eyes. Showed skillset to sit back deep at safety as well as having many reps in both man and zone coverage’s, press and off. Showed willingness to mix it up in run support and close the deal as shown by his high tackle count. Struggles against quick slants and receivers with quick releases. Long speed receivers tended to have their way with Hall if he didn’t redirect off the snap. Tends to get handsy and extend arm when in man coverage causing call for concern with future penalties. Lacks ideal short area quickness and ability to stick with double moves.

Background:

Utility knife for the coaching staff that showed a desire to win and willingness to do what the team needs most and is best for the team, not necessarily himself. Often was moved around and he did so without complain. Noted hard worker by coach Mark Farley. Missouri Valley Football Conference Defensive Player of the Year

Team Fit:

If the Bucs truly want lanky corners with good ball skills, similar to Banks on the roster, then Deiondre’ Hall very well may be there target. The tall and lengthy corner fits best in a zone scheme where he’s allowed to help in run support and keep his eyes on the quarterback.

 

 

 

7.Artie Burns, Corner Back, Miami

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 193 lbs

Class: Junior

Tackles: 36

Tackles for a Loss: 0.5

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 5

Interceptions: 6

Skillset Evaluation:

Artie Burns is the premier athlete of the group when you factor in measurables and natural athletic talent. Burns has good hands and tends to take risk into getting quarterbacks to throw his way. Will win the 50/50 ball and isn’t afraid to scrap it up at the LOS. Shows incredible closing speed and has the recovery speed to make up for mistakes out in coverage. Plays with very high confidence. Plays with poor discipline in coverage and is sloppy when playing in man coverage. Plays with poor pad level when backpedaling and appears to struggle to sink hips and open up to run. Technique needs major refinement. Not a big factor in run support, often takes round about approach versus going heads up and through the blocker. Will struggle to release and tends to ride the block instead of fighting to disengage. Shows all the physical tools needed but lacks the finer things needed to hold up in coverage penalty free.

Background:

Two sport athlete in football and track where he pulled off 3 state titles in the 110 meter hurdles. All American and All Conference honors as a hurdler. Second team all ACC in 2015 while rotating in and out for Miami. Lost his mother during college and father was incarcerated, the University helped set up a fund to help the family get by. Burns enters the draft early and will look to provide for that very family.

Team Fit:

Burns provides some length and incredible athleticism and good hands to a secondary needing help. Burns is not a candidate to start day one and in all likelihood would need time to develop and refine his technique.

 

 

 

 

8. Harlan Miller, Corner Back, Southeastern Louisiana

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 182 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 49

Tackles for a Loss: 5.5

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 10

Interceptions: 4

Skillset Evaluation:

Miller is a lengthy corner with solid height at 6’0″. Displays good foot quickness off the snap. Uses length well, jamming at the line and transitioning to run. Shows the ability to backpedal and drive forward out of the stance. Shows solid instincts for the position and when allowed to backpedal and drop into zone, shows the ability to break on routes and come up and tackle. Consistent tackler, lacks ideal strength but will mix it up. High productivity over his three seasons. In man coverage, will struggle to hug the hip of the receiver. Can’t recover from blown coverage as his top end speed is marginal. Aggressively attacks the ball and it will get him in some trouble at times as expected. Struggles taking angles to the ball when playing the run and will get swallowed up by blocks.

Background:

2nd Team AP-All American and 1st Team All Southland Conference. Miller hadn’t taken a snap at corner until he stepped onto the Southeastern campus. Miller was a Senior Bowl invitee and that solidified a college career that started out as an under recruited prep prospect turned NFL prospect. With a chip on his shoulder, Miller doesn’t need others to praise him. “I always have the chip on my shoulder that a lot of teams missed out on me,” Miller said. “I let my playing on the field do the talking for me.” Coaches praise Miller’s character and work ethic. “They see the athleticism,” Roberts said. “The football intelligence is very high. He’s coachable. I think those things are huge. His ability… you’re going to enjoy being around him on a day to day basis. There’s a lot of guys out there you can’t say that about.”

Team Fit:

Harlan Miller fits the bill as a zone corner that can play press if he’s asked to as shown by his three seasons playing press man. Miller has the length to eventually start outside and would provide immediate depth and youth to the corner position.

 

 

 

 

9. Jalen Mills, Corner Back, LSU **Injured in ’15, Stats from ’14**

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 191 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 62

Tackles for a Loss: 3

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 5

Interceptions: 1

Skillset Evaluation:

Mills displays the smarts and quickness to play in the slot, where he did his best work at LSU. Mills played nickel and free safety at LSU as a Senior, coming off an injury to finish the final 6 games. Mills displays good press skills at the LOS and has fluid hips. Locates ball in coverage and gets head turned around on deep balls. When forced to turn his back to the play on slants and quick outs, will struggle and get handsy while at times never locating the ball. Shows ability to come off edge and blitz from slot and does a good job when sitting in zone coverage. Showed ability to mirror and run on hip of receivers out of the slot. Struggles with double moves and will rely heavily on his recovery speed at times. While racking up tackles from a numbers standpoint, struggled to make plays at or behind the LOS. When beat on back to back plays he will begin to implode. Struggles to stay within his emotions in the heat of the moment.

Background:

Charged with second degree battery in 2014 that was later reduced to a misdemeanor. Aside from that incident, has stayed relatively clean off the field. Struggled with injuries while at LSU but showed great resilience bouncing back. Showed he had tremendous work ethic coming back from surgery early to play and play well. Will do what’s best for the team position wise and was the vocal/emotional leader of the LSU defense.

Team Fit:

The Buccaneers could use help inside and out at corner and Mills ability to play both the slot and safety should bold well for his draft status. Not an outside corner based on struggles with man coverage and tracking on the sidelines, Mills will fit right in as a slot/nickel guy in the NFL.

 

 

 

10. Xavien Howard, Corner Back, Baylor

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 201 lbs

Class: redshirt Junior

Tackles: 42

Tackles for a Loss: 1

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 10

Interceptions: 5

Skillset Evaluation:

Howard shows good short area quickness and reactionary skills to help with crossing and quick out patterns. Showed the ability to jump the route and get hands on the ball. Has shown the ability to consistently turn his head, locate the ball and play it in the air. Howard played exclusively as an island corner, very few zone looks. Long speed isn’t there, will get burned when turning his head to locate ball at times and is very handsy down the sidelines. Will hold when beat but will also use hands well to disrupt the catch. Not a threat to help out against the run when it comes his way, often stuck on his block with little to show for fighting off and shedding. Physical play in coverage does not translate to the run game at all. Has shown reliable hands and the ability to extend and contest the pass consistently.

Background:

Howard plays in arguably the most high octane offensive conference in college football and has had to learn to deal with the good and the bad that comes with it. Confidence in this conference is a must to play defensive back. “X is a great player,” Baylor cornerback Ryan Reid said. “I think he’s the best corner in the Big 12. He’s tall and has some muscle on him. When the ball goes his way I feel it’s an incomplete pass or an interception.” Howard doesn’t lack confidence himself. “This is my second year starting at cornerback and I got a lot of repetitions and I know where to be at the right time,” Howard said. “I’ve watched a lot of film, so it’s knowing what’s going on and making plays. I know people were saying (the secondary) was the weakness. But everybody got better and wants to be great.” Coach Briles doesn’t lack confidence in Howard either. “If you can find a DB with really good ball skills, then they’ll have potential to make a lot of plays for you because they’re going to be around the ball a bunch,” Briles said. “I think that’s what separates him besides his physical ability and his stature. He’s a big guy. He’s probably a little over 6-foot, right at 200 pounds, and can run. That’s why he’s our lockdown guy and has done well the last couple years.” Howard has a unique viewpoint as a corner facing pass happy offenses. Howard in high school was a quarterback. Howard was not only a two way player in high school as a football star, he also played basketball and ran track.

Team Fit:

Howard has solid size and a good build. His quick and sudden movements fit well in the slot as does his gritty play. He has the height to play outside and a skill set that allows him to play both man and zone coverages. While Howard will have to get more aggressive and work o overall technique, he could serve as a mid round pick that has starter potential down the line.

 

 

 

 

11.Will Redmond, Corner Back, Mississippi State **Played 6 Games in ’15**

Height: 5’11″

Weight: 182 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 20

Tackles for a Loss: 0

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 1

Interceptions: 2

Skillset Evaluation:

Redmond displays very good foot quickness and fluid hips to turn and run in coverage. Showed ability to cover in man, zone and slip inside to the slot. Showed good closing burst on outs and slants when playing behind in zone. Showed good effort against the run and a desire to lay into his man. Struggles with missed tackles, rarely looks to wrap up and instead is constantly going for the big blow. Consistently takes risks, often biting hard on fakes and will go balls out for the ball which leaves his man a catch away from open grass. While a senior, still relatively “young” game wise as a payer as he dealt with injuries.

Background:

Redman entered Mississippi State and was unable to play his freshman year due to an investigation that determined he and his family received benefits for his recruitment. Redmond struggled to earn a start as a Junior but still played regularly and led the team in interceptions with 3 that season. In 2015, Redmond earned that starting role and was off to a good start until an ACL tear destroyed his season, and potentially part of 2016. A two-way athlete in high school, Redmond played quarterback and defensive back.

Team Fit:

Redmond shows the quickness and aggression to play in a zone scheme and could thrive in a slot role. For a team that couldn’t defend the slant a year ago, Redmond would be the ideal type of player to patrol the slot and redirect players off the snap.

 

 

 

12.Cyrus Jones, Corner Back, Alabama

Height: 5’10″

Weight: 197 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 44

Tackles for a Loss: 2

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 2

Pass Breakups: 13

Interceptions: 3

Skillset Evaluation:

Jones is one of the most self confident corners in the draft. Displays the strength to redirect at the line and shows solid quickness and decent hips. Shows good discipline in off coverage and zone coverage, holding position until last second. Will lose track of man at the top of his routes and with double moves. In zone coverage will struggle to feel top end receiver once passed. Displays good physical coverage, hugging hip and contesting ball. Will be late to turn his head at times. Shows good awareness against the run, when in zone coverage shows the willingness to come up in support and contain the edge. Incredible return man, special team asset in NFL. Lacks ideal long speed to run with receivers outside. Lacks ideal height and length and will most likely be relegated to the slot in the NFL for a zone based team.

Background:

High confidence, high character player. Incredible work ethic and well liked by teammates. Jones is a leader and did so for the Crimson Tide. NFL . com had the following quote from an NFL Executive. “He may need to get his Twitter game in check because I think he lets some of that stuff get to him, but it’s just more fuel for his fire. He thinks everyone is always disrespecting him from media to the other team. I like him. You will never have to worry about his football character while he’s in the league.” Had a domestic violence charge dropped against him as his only known off field question mark.

Team Fit:

Whether it’s a nickel back or return man, the Bucs need help. Jones offers an immediate massive upgrade on special teams from Rainey as well as a potential long term slot guy as he continues to develop.

 

 

 

 

13.D.J. White, Corner Back, Georgia Tech

Height: 5’11″

Weight: 193 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 38

Tackles for a Loss: 0

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 1

Pass Breakups: 8

Interceptions: 2

Skillset Evaluation:

White shows good feel for his position in coverage and plays with a good balance of skill and technique. Shows short area burst and quickness to close on ball and play slants. Displays ability to redirect at the line and stick in man coverage. Tremendous leaping ability when extending out to bat ball. Shows good instincts and ability to go up and get it. Doesn’t wrap up immediately and is a tad late to react once catch is made. Will struggle to turn head around on deep ball when beat. Struggles to transition smoothly out of back pedal.

Background:

Voted team captain by teammates. All ACC honorable mention in 2014. Noted hard worker by coaches and teammates while leading the Tech defense. White has a clean history on and off the field and is a good locker room guy.

Team Fit:

White possesses the skillset needed to play both inside and out and would be a developmental player, groomed into a potential #3 corner. His locker room presence should fit in nicely.

 

 

 

 

14.James Bradberry, Corner Back, Samford

Height: 6’1″

Weight: 211 lbs

Class: redshirt Senior

Tackles: 45

Tackles for a Loss: 4

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 11

Interceptions: 2

Skillset Evaluation:

Bradberry shows the ability to jam at the line and redirect. Shows ability to sit in zone and make plays on the ball. Gets up to gear quickly. Struggles to backpedal, open up and run. Plays with high hips and lacks explosion out of the backpedal to break on the ball. Tends to be a tad late with his breaks and will allow the receiver to box him out. Good wingspan and height for the position. Displays decent tackling technique and is a willing participant in run defense.

Background:

Originally attended Arkansas State and was asked to redshirt while learning the safety position, Bradberry decided he wanted to continue his career as a corner and left for Samford. Senior bowl invitee and noted dedicated worker on and off the field. Bradberry has been advised that his future may be at safety but has decided to roll forward as a corner for the time being.

Team Fit:

Bradberry is a potential late round developmental player at safety and corner at this point. With good height and length, Bradberry could develop into a solid depth player in the defensive backfield.

 

 

 

 

15.Briean Boddy-Calhoun, Corner Back, Minnesota

Height: 5’9″

Weight: 193 lbs

Class: redshirt Senior

Tackles: 48

Tackles for a Loss: 1.5

Sacks: 0.5

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 6

Interceptions: 4

Skillset Evaluation:

Smooth athlete with ability to transition flawlessly out of back pedal to full on sprint. Good footwork. Shows ability to sit in zone and jump out of back pedal to come forward. Shows ability to leap and play ball in the air. Struggles with separation issues when outside and lacks initial gear to get a good jump on the ball when coming up for outs and slants. Will struggle in run support, lacking strength to make downhill stops as well as inability to shed blocks.

Background:

Former track athlete in high school (high jump). 2-time all conference honors and an integral part of his teams defensive success his past two seasons in college. Boddy-Calhoun boasts 9 interceptions over the last two seasons, is a dedicated worker to his craft on and off the field.

Team Fit:

The Bucs need slot help and Boddy-Calhoun could provide that down the line. With some refinement and hard work he could develop into a good nickel corner and special teamer.

 

 

15.Ken Crawley, Corner Back, Colorado

Height: 6’0″

Weight: 187 lbs

Class: Senior

Tackles: 40

Tackles for a Loss: 1.5

Sacks: 0

Forced Fumbles: 0

Pass Breakups: 10

Interceptions: 1

Skillset Evaluation:

Crawley displays quick and nimble footwork and shows the ability to flip the hips and run with his man. Crawley has smooth acceleration and displays the ability to come up out of the back pedal and explode forward. Crawley struggles on 50/50 balls and doesn’t display great hands. Crawley plays the ball well when batting it down but when he goes for the pick he tends to let the ball travel in versus high pointing and plucking it out of the air. Crawley is a solid tackler and willing to come up in run support. Shows the ability to sit in a zone, though he does struggle with discipline at times. Has the competitiveness to play man. Crawley racked up pass interference calls and gave up a rough number of touchdowns, both which will haunt him come draft day.

Background:

Shrine Game invitee participated all week and in the game. Crawley entered his senior year as a second team all Pac-12 honoree. Crawley is active in his community and is noted as being top notch on and off the field as a person.

Team Fit:

Crawley matches up well as slot corner in the NFL as well as a special teamer. Crawley has a lot of work and refining to do which will land him as a developmental selection in the latter part of day 3 come draft time. The Buccaneers could use some defensive back help and Crawley could eventually become solid depth as well as a spot starter in nickel packages.

 


 

 

Grades:

  1. Vernon Hargreaves III – 8.4
  2. William Jackson III – 8.1
  3. Eli Apple – 7.8
  4. Kendall Fuller – 7.7
  5. Mackensie Alexander – 7.7
  6. Deiondre’ Hall – 7.5
  7. Artie Burns – 7.4
  8. Harlan Miller -7.3
  9. Jalen Mills – 7.2
  10. Xavien Howard – 7.2
  11. Will Redmond – 7.1
  12. Cyrus Jones – 6.9
  13. D.J. White – 6.6
  14. James Bradberry – 6.3
  15. Briean Boddy-Calhoun – 6.1
  16. Ken Crawley – 5.8

Grade Scale:

9.0 – 10 (Top 5)

8.4 – 8.9 (Top 10)

8.1 – 8.3 (Top 15)

7.8 – 8.0 (1st Round)

7.5 – 7.7 (2nd Round)

7.2 – 7.6 (3rd Round)

6.8 – 7.1 (4th Round)

6.4 – 6.7 (5th Round)

6.0 – 6.3 (6th Round)

5.7 – 5.9 (7th Round)

0.0 – 5.6 (Undrafted)

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